Now that you have purchased a fine art canvas print, you have a work of art that will last a lifetime. Printed with archival quality material and coated, your canvas print should last over 100 years if cared for properly. Some care may be needed to make sure your print up to its full potential. Follow these simple steps to make sure your treasured fine art canvas print lasts.
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Caring for your Canvas Print

Now that you have purchased a fine art canvas print, you have a work of art that will last a lifetime. Printed with archival quality material and coated, your canvas print should last over 100 years if cared for properly. Some care may be needed to make sure your print up to its full potential. Follow these simple steps to make sure your treasured fine art canvas print lasts.
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Wiping down a canvas triptych.
Wiping down a canvas triptych.

Now that you have purchased a fine art canvas print, you have a work of art that will last a lifetime. Printed with archival quality material and coated, your canvas print should last over 100 years if cared for properly.

Some care may be needed to make sure your print up to its full potential. Follow these simple steps to make sure your treasured fine art canvas print lasts.

First of all, don’t handle your print unnecessarily, and if you need to handle the print, make sure your hands are clean. Washing your hands before touching your print will go a long ways to remove oils and dirt that over time will discolor the surface of your canvas print.

Touching your print repeatedly could leave unsightly fingerprints. In addition, moving your photo on canvas repeatedly can lead to accidental nicks and tears from brushing up against furniture and walls. You will want to treat your gallery wrap just like any other piece of art and just as with any artwork you may experience some unwanted scratches and nicks. These can be touched up with any type of archival ink pen or marker which can be purchased at your local art or craft store.

When placing your print initially, choose a spot that will display your print properly without putting it in danger of being hit or scratched. Choose a reasonably shaded spot, not one constantly exposed to direct sunlight. Although the print is UV protected thanks to the coating, if left in direct sunlight the UV rays will cause your canvas print to become dull and fade over several years.

Remember that your print is made from cotton (the canvas) and wood (the canvas frame), two materials very susceptible to changes in humidity and temperature. Although all our materials are treated to withstand this, constant exposure to humidity could cause the wooden stretcher bars to warp, or even cause the canvas to loosen and sag. If this occurs, you will need to lean your canvas against a soft surface and mist the open back of your canvas print with warm water. As the canvas dries it will tighten back up. If your canvas print has a cardboard backing, carefully remove the backing and save it. You can tape it back on after the canvas drys and tightens up.

If you bought your canvas print without a floater frame, you can use the included canvas keys to tighten the canvas print if the sagging persists.

Take the time to care for your canvas photos. The occasional dusting will make your print look like new. Remember to use a dry cloth or feather duster. If necessary, use a damp cloth (remember to wring out your cloth to remove as much water as possible) to clean your print. All of our canvas prints are coated with a protective water resistant laminate.

Do not use liquid solvents or cleaning fluids – no Windex or window cleaners, no isopropyl alcohol – to clean your print, as this can severely damage the print. Solvent will eat through the top laminate coat and even corrode the ink underneath.

By following these simple steps, you will insure that your fine art canvas print will last a lifetime.

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A little bit about me . . .

Back in 1982, my Air Force roommate was in desperate need of some cash, and he had a camera. And I was in the market for a camera as I had TDY (Temporary Duty) orders for Cyprus and was looking for a good camera to take with me. So over some beers and some negotiations with my roommate (and a few hundred dollars later), I found that I had become the owner of a brand spanking new Canon AE-1 camera with an assortment of lens, including a Canon 50mm, a 35mm lens, as well as a telephoto lens.

Fast forward to today, and I am now an owner of a Canon 5D Mark II (looking to upgrade, but can’t decide on my next camera) and a bunch of Canon glass and I am primarily a landscape and travel photographer. Yea, that means that I get up before the sun rises and am out after the sun sets. Makes for interesting times!

Thank you for joining me on this photographic journey and hope to hear from you!

Peace,

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