fbpx
Facebook
Google+
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Reddit
Email

Just down the road from Ta Prohm is Banteay Kdei, a Buddhist temple built by Jayavarman VII in the Bayon style similar to Ta Prohm. Banteay Kdei means the "Citadel of Chambers" and the name is pretty accurate. Although smaller than Ta Prohm, it too is in a state of disrepair and is in the midst of renovations.

However, unlike Ta Prohm, Banteay Kdei does not have the huge crowds that at times overwhelms other sites. The lack of crowds makes your time there special in that you are not fighting everyone to take your photographs and you pretty much have run of the place. When I visited, I could count the number of folks there on one hand, not counting my family (there were only three of us).

Banteay Kdei Views
Landscape view of Banteay Kdei, Angkor Wat Archeological Park, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

[Tweet "The lack of crowds makes your time there special in that you are not fighting everyone to take your photographs"]

I found that my best shots were around the entrance to the site, with the huge trees towering over the first line of walls. This particular temple complex has a moat, however I did not find there to be much visual interest in the moat itself.

Once inside the temple complex, there are a number of building areas one can wander through. I found Banteay Kdei to have very few tourists when I was there, which made this location a much easier one to photograph.

The name, "Citadel of Chambers" is a great moniker, as I would find myself walking from one room into the next. And in my walking around I stumbled upon a Buddhist nun who maintained an altar to Buddha.
The shot I took here in this room with the Buddhist nun ended up being one of my favorite shots from my whole time at Angkor Wat as it represented to me the blending of the ancient with the current day.

Woman at prayer before Buddha at Banteay Kdei, Angkor Wat Archeological Park, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

There are a number of locations with carvings of dancing Asparas on the walls, which are interesting subjects on their own. There was one section with room after room with carvings of dancing Asparas, which made for some great shots.

Bas-relief of dancing apsaras at Banteay Kdei, Angkor Wat Archeological Park, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

 

Overall, this was one of my favorite temples within Angkor Wat, although to be honest, most of what I visited was wonderful in their own right. It is really difficult to leave Angkor Wat and not get some great shots!

[Tweet "There was one section with room after room with carvings of dancing Asparas, which made for some great shots."]

[et_bloom_inline optin_id=optin_1]

PHOTOGRAPHER’S NOTES
Like all the other sites, you will be best served using your 24-70mm lens for most of your shots. Even the exterior shots I took I used the 24mm end of the range and got some nice shots. As many of the rooms lack for good light, you will find yourself either using a tripod or increasing your ISO and decreasing your shutter speed to get the shots you are looking for.

[content_block id=2398 slug=post-bio]

Facebook
Google+
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
Reddit
Email

You might also like . . .

Fine Art Prints

for Purchase

A little about me . . .

Back in 1982, my Air Force roommate was in desperate need of some cash, and he had a camera. And I was in the market for a camera as I had TDY (Temporary Duty) orders for Cyprus and was looking for a good camera to take with me. So over some beers and some negotiations with my roommate (and a few hundred dollars later), I found that I had become the owner of a brand spanking new Canon AE-1 camera with an assortment of lens, including a Canon 50mm, a 35mm lens, as well as a telephoto lens.

Fast forward to today, and I am now an owner of a Canon 5D Mark II (looking to upgrade, but can't decide on my next camera) and a bunch of Canon glass and I am primarily a landscape and travel photographer. Yea, that means that I get up before the sun rises and am out after the sun sets. Makes for interesting times!

Thank you for joining me on this photographic journey and hope to hear from you!

Peace,

© 2018. All rights reserved. David Cote Photography.

Made with with Elementor​​ and OceanWP Theme